TifBlair Centipede

Traffic Tolerance

Shade Tolerance

Drought Tolerance

Maintenance

Dormant In Winter

Fair

Fair

Good

Low

Yes

 

“The Certified Centipede”. TifBlair is a patented variety developed by Dr. Wayne Hannah, USDA/ARS geneticist at the Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton, GA. It is the first “Ceritified” centipede to be commercially available. This unique characteristic offers landscape managers and homeowners a superior variety of known pedigree. It has superior cold hardiness compared to “common” centipede and has improved fall color retention and frost tolerance. It also exhibits superior growth in Low PH soils making it an ideal choice for low maintenance utility turf areas with poor soils. TifBlair Centipede is the lowest maintenance turfgrass available. Left unmowed, TifBlair will only grow to a height of 4-6 inches. It is only available through licensed producers and can be established from seed or sod.

Benefits

  • Superior cold hardiness
  • Deep rooting - drought tolerant
  • Superior growth in low pH soil
  • Exceptional seedling vigor
  • Excellent Fall color retention
  • Known pedigree (genetic purity)

TifBlair, the first "Blue Tag Certified" centipede offers landscape managers and homeowners a superior variety of known pedigree, with consistent and reliable performance.

Characteristics

  • Greater shade tolerance than bermudagrass
  • Leaf texture is coarser than bermudagrass, but finer than St. Augustine
  • Easy to cut and does not "scalp" with infrequent mowing
  • Resists weed and bermudagrass invasion

TifBlair the only Blue Tag Certified centipedegrass provides

Superior Cold Hardiness
Tests at Blairsville, GA (Blue Ridge Mountains) demonstrated that TifBlair can survive cold weather, even to –10°F with minimal stand loss. TifBlair’s improved cold tolerance will allow significant northward expansion of centipede’s zone of adaptation.

Improved Drought Tolerance
TifBlair’s unique deep rooting characteristics coupled with its tolerance to aluminum make it an ideal choice for droughty, eroded, low pH soils common to the southeastern piedmont, mountain and coastal plain regions.

Low pH Soil Tolerance
Comparison growth tests at the Griffin Georgia Experiment Station showed excellent TifBlair growth response in both low pH (to pH 4.2) and high pH soils.

Comparison of TifBlair Centipede and common centipede growth response to low pH soils.

Soil pH Level

TifBlair Certified Centipede

Common Centipede

TifBlair’s Growth Advantage

Low pH
plant diameter

84"

52"

62%

High pH
plant diameter

88"

80"

10%

Planted 6/89, evaluated 8/15/91, Griffin, GA

Improved Seedling Vigor
On-farm comparisons of TifBlair and Common centipede have shown that TifBlair established from seed much more rapidly and with greater consistency than common centipede. This will translate to shorter grow in times, fewer weed problems and denser turfs for the homeowner and landscape companies.

Superior Fall Color Retention
In tests conducted in Alabama, Oklahoma & Georgia, TifBlair consistently had better color longer into the fall than common and other varieties.

Genetic Purity
The development of TifBlair Certified Centipedegrass offers a superior centipede variety of known pedigree, reliable performance and consistency. USDA-ARS and the University of Georgia cooperatively released TifBlair with production protocol establishing it as the first and only "Blue Tag Certified" centipedegrass!


TifBlair Centipede Maintenance & Calendar

Centipedegrass is a slow-growing, apple-green, coarse-leaved turfgrass that is adapted for use as a low maintenance, general purpose turf. It requires little fertilizer (1/2 pound of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per year) infrequent mowing, and grows well in full sun to moderate shade. It does not tolerate traffic, compaction, high-phosphorus soils, high pH, low-potassium soils, excessive thatch, drought, or heavy shade.

Centipedegrass is susceptible to a number of pest-related problems. Symptoms include small circular dead areas after several years of good performance. These areas do not greenup in the spring, or begin to die in late spring or during drought stress. Grass at the edge of affected areas may yellow, wilt, and die. Possible causes include nematodes, ground pearls (an insect), and fairy ring (a disease). Nematode damage appears as weak areas are invaded by weeds. If nematodes are suspected, submit a soil sample for analysis. Ground pearls appear as circular dead areas with only weeds growing in thee center. Fairy rings appear as circular green or dead areas that continue to enlarge for several years. Injury from certain broadleaf weed control herbicides and mismanagement can also result in these systems.

Following proper lawn management practices discussed in this publication is the best means of preventing and controlling centipedegrass problems. Continual loss of centipedegrass may indicate the need to choose another grass species. Contact your County Extension Center for assistance.

Maintenance programs provided by professional lawn care service companies may differ from recommendations given here, yet are equally effective.

March through May

Mowing
Mow lawn at 1 inch at the time of initial greenup. Mow before grass gets above 1 1/2 inches tall. Do not burn off centipedegrass to remove excessive debris because of possible injury to the lawn and potential fire hazard.

Fertilizing
DO NOT apply nitrogen at this time. Yellow appearance may indicate an iron deficiency. Spray iron (ferrous) sulfate (2 ounces in water per 1,000 square feet) or a chelated iron source to enhance color as needed. Follow label instructions.

Watering
Water to prevent drought stress. About 1 inch of water per application each week is needed for growing centipedegrass. Sandy soils often require more frequent watering: i.e., 1/2 inch of water every third day. Proper irrigation may prevent or reduce pest and nonpest problems from occurring later in the summer.

Weed Control
To control crabgrass, goosegrass, and foxtail, apply preemergence herbicides by the time that dogwoods are in bloom. Apply postemergence herbicides in May as needed for control of summer annual and perennial broadleaf weeds, such as knotweed, spurge, and lespedeza. Do not apply until 3 weeks after greenup. Centipedegrass is sensitive to certain herbicides (such as 2,4-D), so follow label directions and use with caution.

Insect Control
Check for white grubs and control if necessary.

Thatch Removal
Power rake (vertical mow) to remove thatch (layer of undecayed grass) in late May if necessary. A 2- or 3-inch blade spacing set 1/4-inch deep in one direction works best. Do not use a power rake with 1-inch blade spacing as severe turf injury may result.

Renovation
Replant large bare areas in May using seed (1/4 to 1/2 pound per 1.000 square feet) or sprigs (3/4 bushel per 1,000 square feet). Mixing seed with 2 gallons of fine sand per 1,000 square feet will aid in distribution. Germination is expected in 28 days but establishment is slow. To ensure good germination, keep the seedbed moist with light, frequent sprinklings several times a day. It is not uncommon for it to take 3 years for a new lawn to become completely established.

June through August

Mowing
Mow lawn at 1 inch. Mow before grass gets above l 1/2 inches tall.

Fertilizing
Fertilize with 1/2 pound of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet (once a year) in mid-June using a high potassium fertilizer (5-5-15, 6-6-12, or 8-8-24).* An additional fertilization in August may enhance performance in coastal locations. Fertilizers without phosphorus (e.g., 15-0-14 or 8-0-24) are preferred if soils exhibit moderate-to-high levels of phosphorus. Yellow appearance may indicate an iron deficiency. Spray iron (ferrous) sulfate (2 ounces in water per 1,000 square feet) or a chelated iron source to enhance color as needed. Follow label directions.

Watering
Water to prevent drought stress. About 1 inch of water per application each week is needed for growing centipedegrass. Sandy soils often requiring more frequent watering; i.e., 1/2 inch of water every third day.

Weed Control
Apply postemergence herbicides as needed for control of summer annual and perennial broadleaf weeds, such as knotweed, spurge, and lespedeza. Centipedegrass is sensitive to certain herbicides (e.g., 2,4-D and MSMA), so follow label directions and use with caution. Do not apply herbicides unless grass and weeds are actively growing and the awn is not suffering from drought stress:

Insect Control
Check for white grubs and control if necessary. Have soil tested if nematode damage is suspected. Contact the Cooperative Extension center in your county for assistance.

September through November

Mowing
Mow lawn at 1 inch. Mow before grass gets above 1 1/2 inches tall. Raise mowing height to 1 1/2 inches several weeks before expected frost.

Fertilizing
Fertilize with 1 pound of potash (K2O) per 1,000 square feet 4 to 6 weeks before expected frost using 1.6 pounds of marinate of potash (0-0-60) or 2 pounds of potassium sulfate (0-0-50)** DO NOT lime centipede grass unless recommended by soil test.

Watering
Water to prevent drought stress. About 1 inch of water per application each week is sufficient for growing centipede grass, Sandy soils often require more frequent watering; i.e., 1/2 inch of water every third day. Water following the onset of dormancy (browning of foliage) if needed to prevent excessive dehydration.

Insect Control
Check for white grubs and control if necessary.

December through February

Mowing
Remove lawn debris (rocks, sticks, and leaves). Do not burn off centipedegrass to remove excessive debris because of possible injury to the grass and potential fire hazard.

Fertilizing
DO NOT fertilize centipedegrass at this time. Submit soil samples for analysis every 3 years to determine nutrient requirements. Be sure to specify centipedegrass. Apply lime or sulfur if suggested in a soil test to raise or reduce soil pH respectively. DO NOT lime centipedegrass unless recommended by soil test.

Watering
Water to prevent excessive dehydration.

Weed Control
Apply broadleaf herbicides as necessary for control of chickweed, henbit, etc. Centipedegrass is sensitive to certain herbicides (e.g- 2-4-D), so follow label directions for reducing rates and use with caution. Selected herbicides (e.g., atrazine or simazine) can be applied in November or December for control of annual bluegrass (Poa annua) and several winter annual broadleaf weeds.

*To determine amount of product required to apply 1/2 pound of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet, divide 50 by the first number on the fertilizer bag. Example: 5-5-15 fertilizer. 50 divided by 5 equals 10 pounds of product to be applied per 1,000 square feet for 1/2 pound of nitrogen.

** To determine amount of product required to apply 1 pound of potash per 1,000 square feet, divide 100 by the third number of the fertilizer bag. Example: 6-6-12 fertilizer. 100 divided by 12 equals 8.3 pounds of product to be applied per 1,000 square feet for 1 pound of potassium.


Related Topics

Integrated Pest Management
Grasscycling




TifBlair Centipede is recommended for  Landscaping.

Learn about Certified Turfgrass.

To compare the various grasses offered by Sandhill Turf, view our
Sod Comparison Chart or click its name below.

T-10 Bermuda
Tifway 419 Bermuda
TifSport Bermuda
El Toro Zoysia
TifBlair Centipede
Piedmont Gold
Bentgrass
 


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